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Table 1 Ages for divergences within Phoenicopteridae based on 12 loci with 2 fossil calibrations

From: A multi-locus inference of the evolutionary diversification of extant flamingos (Phoenicopteridae)

  Age (95% C.I.) Ma
Divergence Total Nuclear Mitochondrial Nuclear + COI Nuclear + cyt b
Crown 4.37 (2.38-7.16) 3 (1.45-5.5) 6.5 (3.65-10.15) 4.02 (2.24-6.73) 5.59 (3.08-9.66)
Phoenicopterus 2.29 (1.07-4.06) 1.67 (0.69-3.21) 2.42 (1.12-4.22) 2.12 (0.99-3.67) 2.42 (1.08-4.51)
Ruber-roseus 1.01 (0.34-1.98) 0.88 (0.25-1.87) 1.18 (0.45-2.2) 0.95 (0.34-1.83) 1.45 (0.51-2.93)
Phoenicoparrus 2.56 (1.26-4.37) 1.83 (0.77-3.5) 4.3 (2.15-6.9) 2.08 (1.06-3.64) 3.82 (1.96-6.69)
Andinus-jamesi 1.34 (0.54-2.47) 0.5 (0.12-1.14) Not recovered 0.81 (0.33-1.56) 2.32 (1.07-4.23)
  1. Ages of divergences within flamingos are in bold followed by the 95% confidence intervals in parentheses. Extant flamingos likely originated at or shortly after the Miocene-Pliocene boundary, making them one of the youngest lineages among living birds. The ages recovered by the nuclear data are consistently much younger than the ages recovered by the mitochondrial data, likely the result of mutational saturation in the mitochondrial sequences.