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Table 1 Differences in preferences between males and females

From: You can't always get what you want: size assortative mating by mutual mate choice as a resolution of sexual conflict

Treatment mean ± SD or median (quartiles) t or z n p
a)     
small vs. medium Males: 78.27% ± 19.50% 4.568 Males: 19 <0.001
  Females: 45.59% ± 24.91%   Females: 21  
small vs. large Males: 100% (96.38%; 100%) -2.752 Males: 21 0.006
  Females: 86.59% (50.00%; 100%)   Females: 23  
medium vs. large Males: 84.56% (51.35%; 100%) -2.478 Males: 24 0.013
  Females: 50.00% (37.95%; 84.05%)   Females: 24  
b)     
small vs. medium Males: 60.00 s ± 25.00 s 4.427 Males: 19 <0.001
  Females: 93.52 s ± 22.89 s   Females: 21  
small vs. large Males: 77.48 s ± 34.79 s -2.377 Males: 21 0.024
  Females: 97.41 s ± 17.10 s   Females: 23  
medium vs. large Males: 66.75 s (51.00 s; 58.63 s) -3.177 Males: 24 0.001
  Females:104.25 s (88.50 s; 113.38 s)   Females: 24  
  1. Differences between males and females concerning a) the relative amount of time at the larger stimulus side and b) the absolute time in both association zones. Differences between the sexes were tested with Wilcoxon or t-tests. t or z = test statistics; n = sample size; p = probability.